JUSTIN O’BRIEN FINISHES “IN THE MONEY” WITH HIS
16:35, GOOD FOR SECOND PLACE.

Wadas, Orrson Take Top Honors in
11th Annual Run for the Cannoli 5K

BY DINO OBERTO

HAZLETON, PA--The 11th Annual Run for the Cannoli 5K was held Sunday, August 17 in conjunction with the St. Mauro’s Italian Festival at Queen of Heaven Parish. With another great turnout of participants, 180 total, none could match the speedy effort of Chris Wadas who, for the second straight year, was the overall winner of the popular mid-summer classic 3.1-mile foot race.

On the women’s side, Marina Orrson was the first female to cross the finish line in a record setting time of 17:41.
Wadas, 32 from Courtdale, broke the tape at 16:14 which was 13 seconds slower than his record run of last year, but still solid enough to claim the overall title.

“I went out easier in my first mile at 4:49 compared to last year which was a bit quicker. The second mile was still good but once I made the right onto James Street that little hill there made my legs feel like cement. At that point I looked back and saw that I had a decent lead so I did what I had to do to maintain it,” said Wadas, who is the head Cross Country/Track and Field Coach at Misericordia University.

Justin O’Brien of Orwigsburg was second at 16:35 while Berwick High School cross-country star Dylan Grearinger rounded out the top three with a 16:51.

Orrson, 23 from Shavertown and a member of the Susquehanna River Runners club, was plenty quick with her effort, coming in sixth overall. This was her first time running the race.
“The first two miles felt good. I PR’d in the second mile but during the third mile I fell off pace a bit when it came time to run the final hill. I really enjoyed the race and it was fun to be part of it,” said Orrson, who most recently won the Valley Great 8 on August 2 in Conyngham.

Second among the ladies was Kathleen Druther at 19:41, with third place being notched by Lisa Steffes with a time of 20:34.

 

LED BY WINNER CHRIS WADAS, THE FRONT OF THE PACK
BEGINS TO PULL AWAY
First place winners each won $100 plus a commemorative jacket. Orrson also won an additional $50 for setting a new course record for females. Second and third place finishers also took home cash awards--provided they met eligibility requirements.

Runners aged 9 to 77 took to the streets for this race and it continues to grow in both numbers and popularity as one of the top challenging foot race events in Northeast PA.


 

 

THE WEATHERLY CROSS COUNTRY TEAM: STANDING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: CYRICK THOMAS,
BRETT KELLY, DILLON BIZARRE, EVAN KUNKLE, JACOB SIRKOT, CHRISTOPHER MACNEAL,
SHANE COLL, KEITH CULLEN, JOEL HINKLE, STEPHEN MACNEAL, TRENT DEMPSEY, JONATHAN
ARTHUR, MICHAEL NEMSHICK, RYAN GILLOTT, ROBERT GILLOTT. KNEELING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT:
JASON LASH, JEREMY MOSER, KEVIN OSIFAT, MASON GERHART, DEANNA STOLPE, MACHAYLA
MCPEAK, DONNA PARISE, KAITLYN MOFFET, MORGAN GOWER, NICK BERGER, KAYLA CRAVER,
JILLIAN BARTEL, ERICKA SHUMAN, HALEY GERHART, JULYA GENEROSO, KIM HARRISON, DEREK
HOUSER, ANTHONY MAGUSCHAK. SITTING: WEATHERLY CROSS COUNTRY COACH AND TEAM IN
TRAINING MEMBER JONATHAN KIDDISH.
Running for a Reason: Weatherly Area XC Coach to
Run Marine Corps Marathon for Special Fund Raising Cause

BY DINO OBERTO

The sport of cross-country is contrasting to so many others. You must train your body to endure miles of running along with the rigors of competing on all types of terrain and a variety of other obstacles. Running is a passion and for all the hard work there comes the self-satisfaction of reaching personal goals each time you begin a workout or race.

For one area runner, that passion has led him to use his talent to help in a worthy cause by raising awareness for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS).

Jonathan Kiddish of Weatherly, PA will be competing in the Marine Corps Marathon in Washington, DC on October 26 as a member of the Team in Training (TNT) program. The purpose of the journey is to raise funds for LLS in order to help find cures and ensure access to treatments for those individuals who have blood cancers. Through his efforts, Kiddish has pledged to raise $2100 which he seeks by way of donations.

His story is touching on how he became involved with TNT. His best friend, Maria McArdle of Jim Thorpe, along with her friend, died in a car accident a number of years ago. Recently, while searching the Internet for information about her, he found the writings of Maria Donata Rothermel. Her words touched him deeply and inspired him to join TNT.

Rothermel wrote:

“TRUTHFULNESS--“I must learn to always be truthful, especially when the truth is needed to help others.”

LOYALTY--“I must learn not to be afraid to stand up for and, if necessary, defend these things in which I so strongly believe.”

CHEERFULNESS--“It’s important to look on the bright side of things.”

HELPFULNESS--“I am trying to become more helpful, by learning to be more aware of peoples’ wants and needs.”

CONSIDERATION--“I must become more aware of other peoples' feelings and never try to purposely hurt someone else.”

She wrote, “If I can master these character traits, then I have a good chance of becoming the very best person I can be. This is important because that is my goal in life,” said Kiddish.

Kiddish, a 1987 graduate of Weatherly Area High School, ran cross for four years. In 2008 he was in a car accident and suffered an injury that kept him in a neck brace for four months. Every attempt to become a runner again ended in failure. A few days of running were followed by more and more days of not running, until months had passed without running a single day. He knew it was time to make a change once and for all and made a commitment to run at least one mile every day for the rest of his life.

The start came on the anniversary of the passing of his best friend. One mile, every day. Then on the start of Day 42 he was told by his four-year-old nephew, “Run two, Jonny.” Two miles soon turned into three, then four, then five.

Kiddish, who is in his first year as Weatherly Area High School Cross Country coach, began training for the marathon one day at a time. To be precise he went exactly 1299 days without missing a day.

While on a recent training run with his team, Kiddish twisted his ankle on a misstep and suffered a sprain. His determination to succeed and run the marathon may have been a factor in his quick recovery, as within two weeks he was back on his feet and working out with his team, continuing to focus on his goal.

“There is no way I am not doing it. I am committed to it. Even if I don’t run from now until the middle of October I’ll still be participating in that marathon,” said Kiddish.

This will not be his first attempt at a marathon. He last ran one in 1998; however, it was with no formal training. This time around he is paying better attention to the task at hand. Along with being part of TNT, now that he is coaching, there is even more will power to succeed.

“It’s very rewarding on many levels. It is a great feeling to be able to help students who want to be runners and be able to motivate them to become better runners and better students,” said Kiddish.

“It is allowing me to use the same values, wisdom, motivation, and inspiration that I have to pass on to others. It’s very significant. Those kids motivate me just by being runners.

“The goal of this marathon is to raise money and awareness for the Leukemia Society--Team in Training is using running to help raise money for people who have blood cancers. I now have an opportunity to expose other runners and young runners to what the Leukemia Society is doing and what the training is doing and how they may someday be able to use running to do more than just get into shape or help their cross-country team in high school or college,” he continued.

“There’s something way beyond running just for a team for points or victories that they can do with their running,” stated Kiddish.

To donate go to:  http://pages.teamintraining.org/epa/corps14/mindfulunity. For more ways to donate and support, e-mail Kiddish at:  mindfulunity@gmail.com.

Facts:
48,610 new cases of leukemia were expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2013.
Leukemia is the most common type of cancer in children and adolescents younger than 20 years, accounting for 26.7% of all cases.
An estimated 3,605 children and adolescents younger than 15 years were expected to be diagnosed with leukemia in the United States in 2013; 3 children every hour.
About 32% of cancer cases in children and adolescents younger than 15 years are leukemia.